Movie Review – Beatriz at Dinner

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Go See Hidden Figures

Please go and see the film Hidden Figures. I saw it today, and, well, WOW. Such an inspirational film. If you are not familiar, Hidden Figures is the fact-based movie about three African-American woman – Katherine Johnson, Dorothy Vaughan, and Mary Jackson – who directly worked on calculations at NASA in order to to get astronaut John Glen to be the first American to orbit the earth. What makes this story phenomenal is that all this is taking place in the 1960s in segregated Virginia. As you can imagine, the women face many subtle and not-so-subtle racism and prejudice because of their skin color. . . . Read More